November 2020 Update!

Well, what a shocker of a late update – the last was in February when I was in England – just before Covid-19 hit Australia, and we scraped back in with only a few days to spare before the first lockdown. So much has happened since then.

Perhaps the most amazing (well, yes, definitely THE most amazing!) was the shortlisting of my historical fiction manuscript, ‘Roses of Budapest’, in the HarperCollins Banjo Prize for an unpublished manuscript. I was a runner up and extend HUGE CONGRATS to Dinuka McKenzie, the winner of the 2020 Banjo Prize, who as a result won a publishing contract from HarperCollins Australia with her crime manuscript ‘Flood Debris’. I can’t wait to read her novel in 2021! You can find the HarperCollins Banjo shortlisting press release below:

https://www.harpercollins.com.au/press-room/harpercollins-publishers-announces-shortlist-for-the-2020-banjo-prize/

I’m continuing to polish ‘Roses of Budapest’, an untold story about a strong young Jewish woman in Nazi-occupied Hungary in WW2. I have SO much passion for this story, and I hope it finds a publishing home soon. Like my protagonist, Matild, I will never give up. 🙂

On the uni front, I am on track to finish my Masters in Writing and Literature thesis, and degree, in July 2021. Again, a story of war, strong women, love, but this time, a strong focus on the reconciliation of trauma – so a lot of literary trauma theory and research. Just as with my novel, I am totally in love with my thesis and have the most amazing and supportive supervisor.

I have another exciting opportunity with ‘Roses of Budapest’ soon, and if anything eventuates I will be sure to let you know.

I don’t need to reiterate how hard 2020 has been for so many people, all over the world. Let’s hope 2021 is a much better, healthier and happier year for all. Together, we can do this. As Emily Dickinson wrote:

“Hope” is the thing with feathers –
That perches in the soul –
And sings the tune without the words –
And never stops – at all –

And sweetest – in the Gale is heard –
And sore must be the storm –
That could abash the little Bird
That kept so many warm –

I’ve heard it in the chillest land –
And on the strangest Sea –
Yet – never – in Extremity,
It asked a crumb – of me.

Thank you so much for your wonderful support,
and take gentle care.

xx




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